Albuterol is made use of for preventing or relieving bronchospasm in patients dealing with exercise-induced asthma or asthma created by other problems. This risk may be more clinically significant with long-acting beta-agonists as compared to short-acting beta-agonists. Beta-agonists may be associated with adverse cardiovascular effects including QT interval prolongation, usually at higher doses, when associated with hypokalemia, or when used with other drugs known to prolong the QT interval. 1 to 2 puffs administered 5 to 20 minutes before exercise. Tolterodine: (Minor) Tolterodine has been associated with dose-dependent prolongation of the QT interval, especially in poor CYP2D6 metabolizers. Higher maximum dosages for inhalation products have been recommended in NAEPP guidelines for acute exacerbations of asthma.13 to 14 years: 24 mg/day PO for syrup; 32 mg/day PO for tablets; FDA-approved labeling for inhaler recommends not exceeding 12 puffs/day; FDA-approved labeling for nebulizer solution for oral inhalation recommends not exceeding 4 doses/day or 10 mg/day (0.083% or 0.5% nebulizer solution), 2.5 mg/day (0.63 mg/3 mL nebulizer solution), and 5 mg/day (1.25 mg/3 mL nebulizer solution). The Global Initiative for Asthma (GINA) guidelines recommend continuous nebulization, followed by intermittent as-needed therapy for hospitalized patients 6 years and older (dose not specified); however, GINA emphasizes delivery via a metered dose inhaler with a spacer is most effective and efficient for mild to moderate exacerbations. Close observation for such effects is prudent, particularly if beta-agonists are administered within 2 weeks of stopping the MAOI. Arrhythmias, sinus bradycardia, and conduction disturbances have occurred during octreotide therapy. This risk may be lower with short-acting beta-agonists as compared to long-acting beta-agonists. Beta-blockers will block the pulmonary effects of inhaled beta-agonists, and in some cases may exacerbate bronchospasm in patients with reactive airways. Of note, MDIs with inline spacers have demonstrated superior drug delivery when compared to jet nebulizers in simulated neonatal lung models. Beta-agonists may be associated with adverse cardiovascular effects including QT interval prolongation, usually at higher doses, when associated with hypokalemia, or when used with other drugs known to prolong the QT interval. Drugs with a possible risk for QT prolongation and TdP that should be used cautiously and with close monitoring with chlorpromazine include the beta-agonists. Emtricitabine; Rilpivirine; Tenofovir disoproxil fumarate: (Minor) Caution is advised when administering rilpivirine with short-acting beta-agonists as concurrent use may increase the risk of QT prolongation. Telithromycin is associated with QT prolongation and torsade de pointes (TdP). Timolol: (Moderate) Use of a beta-1-selective (cardioselective) beta blocker is recommended whenever possible when this combination of drugs must be used together. This risk is generally higher at elevated drugs concentrations. These combinations can lead to symptomatic hypokalemia and associated ECG changes in some susceptible individuals. Beta-agonists can sometimes increase heart rate or have other cardiovascular effects, particularly when used in high doses or if hypokalemia is present. The action of beta-agonists on the cardiovascular system may be potentiated by a halogenated anesthetic. Aerosol metered-dose inhaler: 180 mcg (2 puffs) inhaled orally every 4-6 hours; not to exceed 12 inhalations/24 hours. Beta-agonists may be associated with adverse cardiovascular effects including QT interval prolongation, usually at higher doses, when associated with hypokalemia, or when used with other drugs known to prolong the QT interval. Be careful that the patient does not breathe out into the inhaler mouthpiece. Torsade de pointes (TdP), QT interval prolongation, and complete atrioventricular block have been reported with arsenic trioxide use. Beta-agonists may also be associated with adverse cardiovascular effects including QT interval prolongation, usually at higher doses, when associated with hypokalemia, or when used with other drugs known to prolong the QT interval. Dofetilide: (Minor) Coadministration of dofetilide and short-acting beta-agonists may increase the risk of QT prolongation. Midodrine: (Moderate) Caution and close observation should be used when albuterol is used concurrently with other adrenergic sympathomimetics, administered by any route, to avoid potential for increased cardiovascular effects. [59350] [64470] Inhalation solution for nebulizationFor a 2.5 mg dose of albuterol, dilute 0.5 mL of a 0.5% solution for nebulization to a final volume of 3 mL with 0.9% Sodium Chloride Solution or use 3 mL of the commercially available 0.083% solution for nebulization. Deutetrabenazine: (Minor) For patients taking a deutetrabenazine dosage more than 24 mg/day with a short-acting beta-agonist, assess the QTc interval before and after increasing the dosage of either medication. The Global Initiative for Asthma (GINA) guidelines recommend up to 4 to 10 puffs administered with a spacer every 20 minutes for the first hour for mild to moderate exacerbations. A preservative free generic alternative to Proventil Nebules® (albuterol sulfate) Inhalation Solution 0.083%. Trazodone: (Minor) Trazodone can prolong the QT/QTc interval at therapeutic doses. For the acute asthma exacerbations, the National Asthma Education and Prevention Program (NAEPP) Expert Panel recommends 4 to 8 puffs every 20 minutes for up to 4 hours, then 4 to 8 puffs every 1 to 4 hours as needed. Sensitive patients might experience tremor, sleep difficulties, or mild increases in heart rate. Tamoxifen has been reported to prolong the QT interval, usually in overdose or when used in high doses. The elimination half-life of albuterol ranges from 2.7 to 6 hours, with orally administered albuterol having a shorter half-life than the inhaled product. Acetaminophen; Butalbital; Caffeine; Codeine: (Moderate) Sensitive patients may wish to limit or avoid excessive caffeine intake from foods, beverages, dietary supplements and medications during therapy with beta-agonists. Beta-agonists may be associated with adverse cardiovascular effects including QT interval prolongation, usually at higher doses and/or when associated with hypokalemia. Top of the page. Infants Safe and effective use of combination product not established. Prochlorperazine: (Minor) Phenothiazines like prochlorperazine have been associated with a risk of QT prolongation. Each treatment usually takes about 5 to 15 minutes. 2 to 4 mg PO every 6 to 8 hours. [44002], Following oral inhalation, albuterol is absorbed over several hours from the respiratory tract. Aspirin, ASA; Caffeine; Dihydrocodeine: (Moderate) Sensitive patients may wish to limit or avoid excessive caffeine intake from foods, beverages, dietary supplements and medications during therapy with beta-agonists. Although there are no studies examining the effects of ranolazine in patients receiving other QT prolonging drugs, coadministration of such drugs may result in additive QT prolongation. Drugs with a possible risk for QT prolongation that should be used cautiously and with close monitoring with methadone include the beta-agonists. Poorly controlled or moderately controlled asthma represents risks in pregnant women; there is an increased risk of preeclampsia in the mother and prematurity, low birth weight, and small for gestational age in the neonate. At high doses, loperamide has been associated with serious cardiac toxicities, including syncope, ventricular tachycardia, QT prolongation, TdP and cardiac arrest. Use cautiously with promethazine, which has been reported to cause QT prolongation. Beta-agonists may be associated with adverse cardiovascular effects including QT interval prolongation, usually at higher doses and/or when associated with hypokalemia. Lefamulin has a concentration dependent QTc prolongation effect. Higher maximum dosages for inhalation products have been recommended in NAEPP guideline… Linezolid: (Moderate) Linezolid may enhance the hypertensive effect of beta-agonists. At least one case of hypertension occurred in a patient with previous episodes of high blood pressure who was receiving albuterol and selegiline, a selective MAOI related to rasagiline, concurrently. This risk may be more clinically significant with long-acting beta-agonists as compared to short-acting beta-agonists. 2 puffs every 4 to 6 hours as needed for bronchospasm. -Avoid spraying into the eyes as it may result in precipitation or worsening of narrow angle glaucoma, mydriasis, increased intraocular pressure, acute eye pain or discomfort, temporary blurring of vision, visual halos or colored images in association with red eyes from conjunctival and corneal congestion. Beta-blockers will block the pulmonary effects of inhaled beta-agonists, and in some cases may exacerbate bronchospasm in patients with reactive airways. 0.63 to 2.5 mg via oral inhalation every 4 to 6 hours as needed for symptoms of bronchospasm is recommended by the National Asthma Education and Prevention Program (NAEPP) Expert Panel. Phenelzine: (Major) Beta-agonists should be administered with extreme caution to patients being treated with monoamine oxidase inhibitors (MAOIs) due to their sympathomimetic effects. Diphenhydramine; Phenylephrine: (Moderate) Caution and close observation should be used when albuterol is used concurrently with other adrenergic sympathomimetics, administered by any route, to avoid potential for increased cardiovascular effects. Beta-agonists may be associated with adverse cardiovascular effects including QT interval prolongation, usually at higher doses, when associated with hypokalemia, or when used with other drugs known to prolong the QT interval. Furthermore, it is legal for pharmacists to substitute or compound solutions containing high concentrations of BAC when the physician has prescribed a preservative-free … Thyroid hormones may increase the risk of coronary insufficiency when sympathomimetic agents are administered to patients with coronary artery disease. Therefore, caution is advised when administering olanzapine with drugs having an established causal association with QT prolongation. Albuterol Sulfate Inhalation Solution, 0.083%* 2.5 mg*/3 mL - *Potency expressed as albuterol, equivalent to 3 mg albuterol sulfate. Agents associated with a low, but possible risk for QT prolongation and TdP based on varying levels of documentation include the beta-agonists. The Global Initiative for Asthma (GINA) guidelines recommend 2 to 6 puffs using a valved holding chamber (VHC) with mouthpiece and/or facemask every 20 minutes for the first hour, then 2 to 3 puffs every hour as needed for acute exacerbations. Goserelin: (Minor) Consider whether the benefits of androgen deprivation therapy (i.e., goserelin) outweigh the potential risks of QT prolongation in patients receiving short-acting beta-agonists. Norfloxacin: (Minor) Quinolones have been associated with a risk of QT prolongation and torsade de pointes (TdP). Post-marketing surveillance for lomefloxacin has identified very rare cases of torsade de pointes (TdP). Postmarketing data indicate that hydroxyzine causes QT prolongation and TdP. Carbetapentane; Phenylephrine; Pyrilamine: (Moderate) Caution and close observation should be used when albuterol is used concurrently with other adrenergic sympathomimetics, administered by any route, to avoid potential for increased cardiovascular effects. This risk may be more clinically significant with long-acting beta-agonists as compared to short-acting beta-agonists. Beta-agonists may be associated with adverse cardiovascular effects including QT interval prolongation, usually at higher doses and/or when associated with hypokalemia. Monitor the patients lung and cardiovascular status closely. Prilocaine; Epinephrine: (Moderate) Caution and close observation should be used when albuterol is used concurrently with other adrenergic sympathomimetics, administered by any route, to avoid potential for increased cardiovascular effects. Drugs with a possible risk for QT prolongation that should be used cautiously with venlafaxine include the beat-agonists. FDA-approved labeling Max: 4 doses/day. Encorafenib: (Minor) If encorafenib is coadministered with a short-acting beta-agonist, consider monitoring ECGs for QT prolongation and monitor electrolytes; correct hypokalemia and hypomagnesemia prior to treatment. Beta-agonists may be associated with adverse cardiovascular effects including QT interval prolongation, usually at higher doses, when associated with hypokalemia, or when used with other drugs known to prolong the QT interval. Drugs with a possible risk for QT prolongation include the beta-agonists. Max: 2.5 mg/dose 3 to 4 times daily. Albuterol is racemic beta-agonist, comprised of an equal mixture of R- and S-isomers. In general, the National Asthma Education and Prevention Program (NAEPP) Expert Panel recommends albuterol 0.63 to 2.5 mg via oral inhalation every 4 to 6 hours as needed for symptoms of bronchospasm. This risk may be more clinically significant with long-acting beta-agonists as compared to short-acting beta-agonists. Quetiapine: (Minor) Limited data, including some case reports, suggest that quetiapine may be associated with a significant prolongation of the QTc interval in rare instances. Initially, 2 mg PO 3 to 4 times per day. Monitor for altered therapeutic response to the beta-agonist. Protection may last 2 to 4 hours. Atenolol: (Moderate) Use of a beta-1-selective (cardioselective) beta blocker is recommended whenever possible when this combination of drugs must be used together. Siponimod therapy prolonged the QT interval at recommended doses in a clinical study. Meperidine; Promethazine: (Minor) Beta-agonists may be associated with adverse cardiovascular effects including QT interval prolongation, usually at higher doses and/or when associated with hypokalemia. Its effect on QTc interval is minimal (typically less than 5 msec), and the drug has been used safely in patients with cardiac disease (e.g., recent myocardial infarction, unstable angina, chronic heart failure). Caffeine is a CNS-stimulant and beta-agonists are sympathomimetic agents. Beta-agonists may be associated with adverse cardiovascular effects including QT interval prolongation, usually at higher doses and/or when associated with hypokalemia. Beta-agonists may be associated with adverse cardiovascular effects including QT interval prolongation, usually at higher doses, when associated with hypokalemia, or when used with other drugs known to prolong the QT interval. Atenolol; Chlorthalidone: (Moderate) Use of a beta-1-selective (cardioselective) beta blocker is recommended whenever possible when this combination of drugs must be used together. This risk may be more clinically significant with long-acting beta-agonists (i.e., formoterol, arformoterol, indacaterol, olodaterol, salmeterol, fluticasone; vilanterol, umeclidinium; vilanterol) than with short-acting beta-agonists. Beta-agonists may be associated with adverse cardiovascular effects including QT interval prolongation, usually at higher doses, when associated with hypokalemia, or when used with other drugs known to prolong the QT interval. This risk may be more clinically significant with long-acting beta-agonists compared to short-acting beta-agonists. Elimination half-life is 5 hours. Monitor the patients lung and cardiovascular status closely. Hypokalemia due to beta agonists appears to be dose related and is more likely with high dose therapy. The dose counter only displays even numbers (example: 200, 198, 196, etc.) However, the cardiovascular effects of beta-2 agonists may be potentiated by concomitant use of MAOIs. This risk may be more clinically significant with long-acting beta-agonists (i.e., formoterol, arformoterol, indacaterol, olodaterol, salmeterol, umeclidinium; vilanterol) than with short-acting beta-agonists. Beta-agonists may be associated with adverse cardiovascular effects including QT interval prolongation, usually at higher doses, when associated with hypokalemia, or when used with other drugs known to prolong the QT interval such as ribociclib. Concurrent use may increase the effects of sympathomimetics or thyroid hormone. Citalopram: (Minor) Citalopram causes dose-dependent QT interval prolongation. The optimal dosage for an acute COPD exacerbation is not established; adjust dose according to clinical symptoms and tolerance/adverse effects. 1 inhalation (albuterol-ipratropium bromide 100 mcg-20 mcg) orally four times a day. 2 puffs using a valved holding chamber (VHC) and face mask every 4 to 6 hours as needed for symptoms of bronchospasm is recommended by the National Asthma Education and Prevention Program (NAEPP) Expert Panel. 32 mg/day PO for syrup and tablets; FDA-approved labeling for inhaler recommends not exceeding 12 puffs/day; FDA-approved labeling for nebulizer solution for oral inhalation recommends not exceeding 4 doses/day or 10 mg/day (0.083% or 0.5% nebulizer solution), 2.5 mg/day (0.63 mg/3 mL nebulizer solution), and 5 mg/day (1.25 mg/3 mL nebulizer solution). Monitor the patients lung and cardiovascular status closely. Gilteritinib has been associated with QT prolongation. Consider checking potassium levels if clinically indicated. A preservative free generic alternative to Proventil Nebules® (albuter … Sterile unit dose Foil pouched and embossed vials for easy identification Clinically significant improvement (defined as maintaining at least a 15% increase in FEV1 and a 20% increase in mid-expiratory flow rate over baseline) was recorded for up to 6 hours in a controlled clinical trial of 55 children. Albuterol can be orally administered as a tablet, syrup or inhaler 2. QTc prolongation has been observed with the use of efavirenz. Single doses of 10 to 20 mg have been administered. Sunitinib can cause dose-dependent QT prolongation. Learn about side effects, drug interactions, dosages, warnings, and more. Sorafenib has been associated with QT prolongation. Drugs with a possible risk for QT prolongation that should be used cautiously with halogenated anesthetics include the beta-agonists. Beta-agonists and beta-blockers are pharmacologic opposites, and will counteract each other to some extent when given concomitantly, especially when non-cardioselective beta blockers are used. This risk may be more clinically significant with long-acting beta-agonists as compared to short-acting beta-agonists. Ketoconazole has been associated with prolongation of the QT interval. Acetaminophen; Caffeine: (Moderate) Sensitive patients may wish to limit or avoid excessive caffeine intake from foods, beverages, dietary supplements and medications during therapy with beta-agonists. Abarelix: (Major) Since abarelix can cause QT prolongation, abarelix should be used cautiously, if at all, with other drugs that are associated with QT prolongation. You may use 2 additional treatments per day if needed. The net result of beta2-receptor agonism in the lungs is relaxation of bronchial and tracheal smooth muscles, which in turn relieves bronchospasm, reduces airway resistance, facilitates mucous drainage, and increases vital capacity.Albuterol can also inhibit the degranulation and subsequent release of inflammatory autocoids from mast cells. Amiodarone: (Minor) Amiodarone, a Class III antiarrhythmic agent, is associated with a well-established risk of QT prolongation and torsades de pointes (TdP). Beta-agonists should be administered with caution to patients being treated with drugs known to prolong the QT interval because the action of beta-agonists on the cardiovascular system may be potentiated. Torsade de pointes (TdP) has been reported with post-marketing use, although causality was not determined. Max: 24 mg/day PO. Amphetamine: (Moderate) Caution and close observation should be used when albuterol is used concurrently with other adrenergic sympathomimetics, administered by any route, to avoid potential for increased cardiovascular effects. Drugs with a possible risk for QT prolongation and TdP that should be used cautiously with TCAs include the beta-agonists. Inhaled short acting beta-agonists treat hyperkalemia through beta-adrenergic stimulation of cellular potassium (K+) uptake. 6 to 12 years: 24 mg/day PO for syrup and tablets; FDA-approved labeling for inhaler recommends not exceeding 12 puffs/day; FDA-approved labeling for nebulizer solution for oral inhalation recommends not exceeding 4 doses/day or 10 mg/day (0.083% or 0.5% nebulizer solution), 2.5 mg/day (0.63 mg/3 mL nebulizer solution), and 5 mg/day (1.25 mg/3 mL nebulizer solution). (Minor) Tricyclic antidepressants (TCAs) share pharmacologic properties similar to the Class IA antiarrhythmic agents and may prolong the QT interval, particularly in overdose or with higher-dose prescription therapy (elevated serum concentrations). Beta-blockers will block the pulmonary effects of inhaled beta-agonists, and in some cases may exacerbate bronchospasm in patients with reactive airways. Drugs with a possible risk for QT prolongation and TdP that should be used cautiously with TCAs include the beta-agonists. Metronidazole: (Minor) Potential QT prolongation has been reported in limited case reports with metronidazole. Beta-blockers will block the pulmonary effects of inhaled beta-agonists, and in some cases may exacerbate bronchospasm in patients with reactive airways. The pharmacodynamic interaction potential to prolong the QT interval of the electrocardiogram between lefamulin and other drugs that effect cardiac conduction is unknown. [31823] [43674] [44010] [49951] [59350] [64470], Albuterol, like other sympathomimetic amines, should be used cautiously in patients with a history of seizures or seizure disorder, hyperthyroidism, pheochromocytoma, or unusual responsiveness to other sympathomimetic amines. This risk may be more clinically significant with long-acting beta-agonists versus short-acting beta-agonists. [28225] Use albuterol with caution in patients with conditions that may increase the risk of QT prolongation including heart failure, bradycardia, myocardial infarction, hypomagnesemia, hypokalemia, hypocalcemia, or in patients receiving medications known to prolong the QT interval or cause electrolyte imbalances. Telithromycin: (Minor) Use caution if short-acting beta-agonists are administered with telithromycin as concurrent use may increase the risk of QT prolongation. Penbutolol: (Moderate) Use of a beta-1-selective (cardioselective) beta blocker is recommended whenever possible when this combination of drugs must be used together. Use cautiously with promethazine, which has been reported to cause QT prolongation. Applies to the following strengths: 2.5 mg-0.5 mg/3 mL; 103 mcg-18 mcg/inh; 100 mcg-20 mcg/inh, Inhalation Aerosol: Beta-agonists may be associated with adverse cardiovascular effects including QT interval prolongation, usually at higher doses, when associated with hypokalemia, or when used with other drugs known to prolong the QT interval. Albuterol is an effective adjunctive treatment for hyperkalemia; beta2-adrenergic stimulation results in intracellular accumulation of serum potassium due to stimulation of the Na/K ATPase pump, leading to moderate degrees of hypokalemia. Inhaled albuterol therapy is preferred over oral treatment. Beta-agonists can sometimes increase heart rate or have other cardiovascular effects, particularly when used in high doses or if hypokalemia is present. Measure sodium bicarbonate concentrations at baseline and periodically during dichlorphenamide treatment. Protection may last 2 to 4 hours. Pregnant women should be closely monitored and medication adjusted as necessary to maintain optimal control. Perphenazine: (Minor) Perphenazine, a phenothiazine, is associated with a possible risk for QT prolongation. Beta-agonists may be associated with adverse cardiovascular effects including QT interval prolongation, usually at higher doses and/or when associated with hypokalemia. Coadministration with other drugs that prolong the QT interval may result in additive QT prolongation. Salbutamol solution is usually administered by nebuliser in a dose of 5 mg. Little evidence exists that this is the optimal dose for bronchodilatation or that this dose is without side-effects. Emtricitabine; Rilpivirine; Tenofovir alafenamide: (Minor) Caution is advised when administering rilpivirine with short-acting beta-agonists as concurrent use may increase the risk of QT prolongation. Additive side effects may occur between caffeine and beta-agonists. Beta-agonists may be associated with adverse cardiovascular effects including QT interval prolongation, usually at higher doses and/or when associated with hypokalemia. Liothyronine: (Moderate) Based on the cardiovascular stimulatory effects of beta-agonists and other sympathomimetics, concomitant use with thyroid hormones might enhance the effects on the cardiovascular system. Entrectinib: (Minor) Coadministration of entrectinib and short-acting beta-agonists may increase the risk of QT prolongation. 2 inhalations (180 mcg) at least 15 minutes prior to exercise; many manufacturers recommend giving 15 to 30 minutes prior to exercise. The action of beta-agonists on the cardiovascular system may be potentiated by a halogenated anesthetic. Chlorpromazine is specifically associated with an established risk of QT prolongation and TdP; case reports have included patients receiving therapeutic doses of chlorpromazine. Additional inhalations can be taken as required. Doses should be delivered over 5 to 15 minutes. Additive side effects may occur between caffeine and beta-agonists. Triptorelin: (Minor) Consider whether the benefits of androgen deprivation therapy (i.e., triptorelin) outweigh the potential risks of QT prolongation in patients receiving short-acting beta-agonists. The mean increase in QTc is about 6 milliseconds, measured at the Tmax of the maximum dosage (1000 mg PO twice daily). The clinical significance of these findings for patients with obstructive airway disease who are receiving albuterol or levalbuterol and digoxin on a chronic basis is unclear. Usual Adult Dose for Asthma. Ivosidenib: (Minor) Coadministration of ivosidenib with short-acting beta-agonists may increase the risk of QT prolongation. Reports of QT prolongation and TdP during risperidone therapy are noted by the manufacturer, primarily in the overdosage setting. Available for Android and iOS devices. Drugs with a possible risk for QT prolongation and TdP that should be used cautiously and with close monitoring with romidepsin include the beta-agonists. Ethacrynic Acid: (Moderate) Loop diuretics may potentiate hypokalemia and ECG changes seen with beta agonists. According to the Global Initiative for Chronic Obstructive Lung Disease (GOLD) guidelines for COPD, inhaled albuterol may be used as first-line therapy in Group A and may also be used in Groups B, C, and D for additional symptom control. Beta-agonists may be associated with adverse cardiovascular effects including QT interval prolongation, usually at higher doses, when associated with hypokalemia, or when used with other drugs known to prolong the QT interval. Lefamulin: (Minor) Coadministration of lefamulin and short-acting beta-agonists may increase the risk of QT prolongation. Adult. Powder metered-dose inhaler: 180 mcg (2 puffs) inhaled orally every 4-6 hours; not to exceed 12 inhalations/24 hours; in some patients 1 inhalation … Use: In patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) on a regular aerosol bronchodilator who continue to have evidence of bronchospasm and who require a second bronchodilator. Agents with potential to prolong the QT interval include the beta agonists. Close observation for such effects is prudent, particularly if beta-agonists are administered within 2 weeks of stopping the MAOI. Quinidine administration is associated with QT prolongation and torsades de pointes (TdP). Inhaled short-acting beta-2 agonists (SABAs) are the therapy of choice for preventing exercise-induced bronchospasm, and they are strongly recommended by the American Thoracic Society for EIB prophylaxis. This risk may be more clinically significant with long-acting beta-agonists as compared to short-acting beta-agonists. Acetaminophen; Caffeine; Phenyltoloxamine; Salicylamide: (Moderate) Sensitive patients may wish to limit or avoid excessive caffeine intake from foods, beverages, dietary supplements and medications during therapy with beta-agonists. Linezolid is an antibiotic that is also a weak, reversible nonselective inhibitor of monoamine oxidase (MAO). Codeine; Phenylephrine; Promethazine: (Moderate) Caution and close observation should be used when albuterol is used concurrently with other adrenergic sympathomimetics, administered by any route, to avoid potential for increased cardiovascular effects. 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